Reconvene the Parliament and Respect the Constitution November 2018 | Brief

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The UN, Myanmar and the Rohingyas October 2018 | Analysis

Will the latest UN report and other reports (past and present) ensure accountability for the perpetrators...

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Building Peace Momentum in J&K September 2018 | Analysis

The earlier approaches of “resolve Kashmir”, leading to a top-down political process have...

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Will Pakistan walk the Afghan Talk? May 2018 | Brief

Those who would like to reshape the Afghan policy and willing to walk the Afghan talk within Pakistan...

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Conflict Primer

Early Warning Conflict Alert
January 2019 | Brief

South Asia: Five Conflicts to Watch in 2019

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Sri Lanka
November 2018 | Brief

Reconvene the Parliament and Respect the Constitution

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Myanmar
October 2018 | Analysis

The UN, Myanmar and the Rohingyas

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Af-Pak
May 2018 | Brief

Will Pakistan walk the Afghan Talk?

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Balochistan
May 2018 | Analysis

Who is targeting the Hazara? And Why?

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Afghanistan I Sectarain
April 2018 | Analysis

The Sectarian Spiral in Afghanistan: Who? And Why?

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Sri Lanka
March 2018 | Analysis

The Anti-Muslim Violence in Sri Lanka

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Maldives
March 2018 | Analysis

The Political Crisis in Maldives

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Peace Scroll

What is Peace? How to achieve it?
Peace in South Asia is defined more as "absence of violence". Hence the predominant approach is to bring the violence to an end, as a part of pursuing peace. End of an "armed" conflict or the disappearance/decline of a militant group is equated as the "return of normalcy".

While violence and the intensity of armed conflict are variables, they cannot be seen as sole factors in defining peace. It is easier to arrest violence in a conflict situation, but converting the same into a proactive peace has been a challenge in South Asia.

What specific measures need to be taken to achieve positive peace? How to convert a "post-violence" society into a "post-conflict" one? More importantly, how to prevent the recurrence of violence and conflicts in the same society?
What measures to pursue to walk the last mile in South Asia?

September 2018| Analysis

Building Peace Momentum in J&K

August 2018| Analysis

Picking up the Indo-Pak Peace

May 2018| Brief

Will Pakistan walk the Afghan Talk?

April 2018| Analysis

“I am not Malala”: Deciphering the anti-Malala Sentiment in Pakistan

November 2017| Analysis

Towards an Inclusive Kashmir Dialogue

Radicalism Project

Radicalism Project
April 2018 | Analysis

“I am not Malala”: Deciphering the anti-Malala Sentiment in Pakistan

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Afghanistan I Sectarain
April 2018 | Analysis

The Sectarian Spiral in Afghanistan: Who? And Why?

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Sri Lanka
March 2018 | Analysis

The Anti-Muslim Violence in Sri Lanka

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Radicalism Project
November 2017 | Brief

The State surrenders to the Mullahs: Why did the Military aid? And why did the Government agree?

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Radicalism Project
November 2017 | Analysis

Pakistan: The Political Rise of Radical Right

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Radicalism Project
November 2017 | Analysis

The Ghost of Mumtaz Qadri

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Radicalism Project
October 2017 | Analysis

The Islamic State in South Asia: Why are the State and Society reluctant to acknowledge?

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Myanmar
September 2017 | Analysis

The Rohingya Politics: Between Strong Military, Weak Government, Rakhine Faultlines and Ma Ba Tha

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Water Conflicts

South Asia is unique in managing its waters and the conflicts arising over its sharing. No other region in the world has as many conflicts over water as South Asia has – both at the bilateral levels and domestically within provinces. It is ironic that the rivers that gave an identity and name to many civilizations and communities within the region have today become bones of contention.

How to address the water conflicts?

How to ensure, that the region moves from the existing confrontational stage to the next one, where they collaborate to harness and make maximum use of available waters? How to ensure rivers become bridges and connectors, instead of being a source of conflict? Finally, how to create “water communities” in South Asia, cutting across provincial and national boundaries?
The above three questions will be the primary focus of CR’s focus on waters.

April 2017| Comment

De-securitizing the Indus

April 2017| Comment

Scarcity, Institutions, Securitization: Our “Other” Water Issues

Conflict Alerts

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